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Cradock Nowell, A Tale Of The New Forest Vol2

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Cradock Nowell, A Tale Of The New Forest Vol2

Cradock is banished by his father following the suspicious death of his twin brother.

Cradock Nowell Volume 2: A tale of the New Forest is a three-volume novel by R. D. Blackmore published in 1866. Set in the New Forest and in London, it follows the fortunes of Cradock Nowell who is thrown out of his family home by his father following the suspicious death of Cradock's twin brother Clayton.

Extract Volume 2:
"What, you here again, you white-livered young sneak!" cried Issachar Jupp, reeling in at the door, just as Cradock was coming out. "Take that, then" and he lifted a great oak bludgeon, newly cut from the towing-path of the Basingstoke Canal. If Cradock had not been as quick as lightning and caught the stick over the bargeman's shoulder, there would have been weeping and wailing and a lifelong woe for Amy."

Cradock Nowell, A Tale Of The New Forest Vol3

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Cradock Nowell, A Tale Of The New Forest Vol3

Cradock is banished by his father following the suspicious death of his twin brother.

Cradock Nowell Volume 3: A tale of the New Forest is a three-volume novel by R. D. Blackmore published in 1866. Set in the New Forest and in London, it follows the fortunes of Cradock Nowell who is thrown out of his family home by his father following the suspicious death of Cradock's twin brother Clayton.

Extract Volume 3:
Although the South–Western Railway had been open so many years, our forest–child had never been further from green leaf and yellow gorse than Winchester in the eastern hemisphere, and Salisbury in the western. And now after all to think that she was going to London, not for joy, but sorrow.

Domesday Tables For The New Forest

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Domesday Tables For The New Forest

Domesday transcribed to tables. Showing details as they were for Tenant in Chief, Undertenant and Saxon Holder.

From the author: The attempt to reduce Domesday to a tabular form needs no apology.

Tables are horrible to most of us and many things are to be found in Domesday besides figures, but after all the main object of Domesday was to record statistics and it is well to have them in a convenient form; indeed without tables it is almost impossible to appreciate the facts recorded, for it is very difficult by merely reading the text to get a general view of even one feature in a single county.

It is in the hope of assisting the student to general views of the country as described in Domesday, not for the sake of the detail, that these tables have been printed ; but also that his general views may not be founded only upon county totals and averages.

Early Wars Of Wessex

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Early Wars Of Wessex

Casting new light (as of the time) on the 'Dark Ages'. Compiled from fragmentary records.

Albany F Major (1858 to 1925)

The fragmentary nature of the records which tell us how Britain became England has led to many attempts at a reconstruction of the story from unwritten evidence. The reason, and perhaps the justification, for these endeavours is to be found in the fact that much of the early history of these islands remains writ large on the face of the country, if only we had the knowledge and ability to interpret the signs aright.

The following studies are based upon considerable personal knowledge of the west country, and an intimate acquaintance with the localities which figure more prominently in the argument.

Fox Hunting Recollections

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Fox Hunting Recollections

Fox-hunting recollections by Sir Reginald Graham.

Sir Reginald Henry Graham, 8th Baronet (1835 to 1920). Published by Eveleigh Nash in 1907.

Contents Includes: The Beaufort Hunt; The Burton Hunt; The Cotswold Hunt; The New Forest Hunt; The Tedworth Hunt; The Hurworth Hunt.

From the text: After the Deer Removal Act of 1851 the red deer were ordered to be destroyed, and Captain Buckworth Powell of Foxlease, with Mr. Hay Morant of Brockenhurst Park, were some of the first to start a few couples to hunt them. Then Mr. Grantley Berkeley, with two or three bloodhounds, killed a few, and they all gradually disappeared.

From Harbour To Harbour

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From Harbour To Harbour

The story of Christchurch from the earliest times to the present day (1916).

Nancy Bell (Aka - Mrs Arthur Bell)

From the author: From whatever point of view the beautiful coast district between Christchurch Estuary and Poole Harbour is considered, it is full of absorbing interest. The student of geology and prehistoric lore, the archaeologist, the historian, and the naturalist find in it an inexhaustible field of enquiry, whilst its romantic scenery affords an infinite variety of subjects for the artist.

From the text:The oldest strata now to be considered are the Bagshot sands of lacustrine or fluviatile origin beneath Poole Harbour, that extend eastwards till they are replaced near Hengistbury Head by the Bracklesham sands, which differ greatly from them. These sands were laid down in a southern sea, not in such fresh or brackish water as the earlier Bagshot beds, a sea that extended over much of what was to become Northern France, and gradually increased in depth during the formation of the deposits, layers of shells of mollusca such as could not have lived in shallow water occurring in them.

Hampshire

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Hampshire

County, coast, town and country described in detail.

Reverend Telford Varley (1886 to 1938)

From the text: The New Forest, as might be supposed, is a remarkably good collecting-ground, not only for Lepidoptera, but also for beetles, of which there are many rare species, and several that are found nowhere else.

Wood names are numerous. Clearings are "cleres," as Kingsclere, Burghclere, and Highclere. "wood" occurs in Woodhay (Wood-hedge), Odiham (woodyham). "holt," "hurst," "shaw," all meaning wood, in Linkenholt (wood of limes), Brockenhurst (badger's wood) and Bramshaw. Woods growing down the slopes of a hill are hanging woods, or "hangers," as in Oakhanger, and wild life is reflected in "Wolvesey" (Wolves' Isle), Wolmer (wolves' mere or wolves'pond), and Brockenhurst as mentioned above.
 

Hampshire Allegations For Marriage Licences, Winchester Vol 1

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Hampshire Allegations For Marriage Licences, Winchester Vol 1

Marriage Licenses granted in the Winchester Diocese from 1689 to 1837 (A to L)

Volume 1, Surnames A to L. Couples wishing to marry in England had to swear in an allegation that there were no impediments to the marriage when they applied for a marriage licence. The granting of the licence by the bishop of Winchester allowed the couple to marry in any parish within the diocese.

Marriage licences from 1604 were issued only by the ecclesiastical authorities which had jurisdiction over the parish where the marriage was to take place. Licences enabled couples to marry without publication or calling of banns in church. 

Licences could only be issued 'upon good caution and security taken'. Therefore anyone applying for a licence was required to enter into a bond with sureties which was usually filed with a marriage allegation.

Hampshire Allegations For Marriage Licences, Winchester Vol 2

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Hampshire Allegations For Marriage Licences, Winchester Vol 2

Marriage Licenses granted in the Winchester Diocese from 1689 to 1837 (M to Z)

Volume 2, Surnames M to Z. Couples wishing to marry in England had to swear in an allegation that there were no impediments to the marriage when they applied for a marriage licence. The granting of the licence by the bishop of Winchester allowed the couple to marry in any parish within the diocese.

Marriage licences from 1604 were issued only by the ecclesiastical authorities which had jurisdiction over the parish where the marriage was to take place. Licences enabled couples to marry without publication or calling of banns in church. 

Licences could only be issued 'upon good caution and security taken'. Therefore anyone applying for a licence was required to enter into a bond with sureties which was usually filed with a marriage allegation.

Hampshire Days

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Hampshire Days

The people both gentry and peasantry, the places, wildlife and seasons.

William Henry Hudson (1841-1922) Author, naturalist and ornithologist.

From the author: The greater part of the matter contained in this volume has not appeared before. In the first half of the book use has been made of an article on "Summer in the Forest" from Longman's Magazine. In the second half I have drawn on articles from the same periodical, on "A Summers End on the lichen". I have also made use of an article from the Badminton Magazine.

From the text: Hornet and Bank-Vole: Wishing to see more, I spent most of that day and the day following at the spot, and saw hornet and vole meet many times. If the vole was at the sap when the hornet came he was at once driven off, and when the hornet was there first the vole was never allowed to feed....

Hampshire Water-Colours

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Hampshire Water-Colours

18 Water Colours painted around Southern Hampshire and the New Forest.

1.  Tower of College Chapel, Winchester
2.  Church of St. Lawrence, Winchester
3.  Middle Gate, Winchester College
4.  The Itchen near Chilland Mill
5.  Romsey
6.  (missing)
7.  Christchurch
8.  Sopley
9.  (missing)
10. Lymington
11. Beaulieu Village
12. Portsmouth from Gosport
13. Portchester
14. Sheet Mill, near Petersfield
15. Upton Grey
16. Old Basing Bridge
17. Near Liphook
18. Headley
19. Chilbolton, Test Valley
20. High Street, Winchester (cover artwork)

Historical Record Of The 67th South Hampshire Regiment

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Historical Record Of The 67th South Hampshire Regiment

The 67th from 1758 (Foundation) to 1849.

An account of the original formation of the regiment in 1758. The Stations at which it has been from time to time employed. The Battles, Sieges, and other Military Operations in which it has been engaged, particularly specifying any Achievement it may have performed, and the Colours, Trophies it may have captured from the Enemy.

Appointments
Colonels by date
Uniforms
Stations
Campaigns

How to Choose a Horse

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How to Choose a Horse

Buying a horse. What to look for in general and the breeds in particular.

Introduction: How to Choose a Horse, or, Selection Before Purchase, has been written as a guide to those who are compelled to purchase a Horse in the absence of skilled assistance, and for such also who are desirous of acquiring a rudimentary knowledge previous to the employment of a qualified Veterinary Surgeon.

From the text: When choosing a horse in a market, particular care is necessary, because many of the vendors have patched-up animals to dispose of and if they are successful in disposing of such, there is little prospect of seeing the individual again.

Memoranda Of The Parishes Of Hursley And North Baddesley

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Memoranda Of The Parishes Of Hursley And North Baddesley

Names, dates and events. Known local history from the 17th and 18th century.

The following Account of the Parish of Hursley, was drawn up nearly five years ago (1803) as an amusement without the most distant view to Publication, and certainly would never have appeared in its present form, but in compliance with the suggestion of a Friend much interested in the Parish, who earnestly recommended, and liberally encouraged, the printing of it.

The parish of Hursley lies in the hundred of Buddlesgate, and division of Fawley; and the villlage 'is situated on the turnpike-road leading from Winchester to Romsey, and nearly at an equal distance from each of those places.

The parish of North Baddesley lies in the hundred of Mainsbridge, and is situated at the distance of three miles, nearly east, from the town of Romsey. At the same distance to the South-west, from the village of Hursley, and at about six miles, nearly North, from the town of Southampton,

Memorials Of Old Hampshire

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Memorials Of Old Hampshire

The New Forest is described here by Willingham F Rawnsley.

From the text: The oldest existing perambulation of the New Forest, made in 1280, shows the bounds to be east and west, the Southampton river and the Avon; south, the sea-coast; north, the line running east and west from Owerbridge to North Charford. This detail is preserved in the Chapter House of Westminster.

The officers of the Forest ranged from the Lord Warden and his lieutenant to a verminer and sub-verminer, between whom came a riding forester, a bow-bearer, two rangers, two woodwards, four verderers, two stewards, twelve regarders, nine foresters or master-keepers, and thirteen (originally fifteen) under-foresters or groomkeepers.

Our Woodland Trees

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Our Woodland Trees

Introduction, overview and details of sixty one species of tree.

Francis George Heath (1843 to 1913)

From the author: The first part of this volume has been written in order to supply what the Author believes to be essential as an introduction to a study of Forest Trees.

The second part aims to enkindle the love of Nature, which the Author is convinced is in the hearts of his readers. At the same time it is intended to convey pleasantly nay, lovingly, as much information relating to its subject as people who lead busy lives are likely to have time to acquire.

Ponies Past and Present

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Ponies Past and Present

Six breeds of Pony are described.

Sir Walter Gilbey (1831 to 1914)

Introduction: The early history of the horse in the British Islands is obscure. The animal is not indigenous to the country, and it is supposed that the original stock was brought to England many centuries before the Christian era by the Phoenician navigators who visited the shores of Cornwall to procure supplies of tin.

From the text: The demand for New Forest ponies increased, and the commoners took advantage of the higher prices obtainable to sell the best of their young stock, thus the breed steadily degenerated, until the late Prince Consort sent a grey Arab stallion to stand at New Park.
 

Recollections Of Royalty, The Death Of William Rufus Vol 1

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Recollections Of Royalty, The Death Of William Rufus Vol 1

Royal history explained from William Rufus in 1100.

Charles Chadwicke Jones (1800 to 1852)

Preface: From numerous diaries, memoirs, histories of particular reigns, state papers, private MSS, and other scarce and authenticated sources of historical information, much new light has been thrown upon many hitherto mysterious, controversial, and confused affairs of state, during particular periods of English history.

From the text: William (surnamed Rufus), the third son of the Conqueror, succeeded his father on the throne of England; but inherited neither his wisdom, nor his steady greatness. No marked alteration for the better in the general state of England, characterizes his reign, though the seeds of national improvement sown by the Conqueror were gradually but silently unfolding themselves.

Remarks On Forest Scenery And Other Woodland Views Volume 1 (Revised)

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Remarks On Forest Scenery And Other Woodland Views Volume 1 (Revised)

William Gilpin visits and views sites of arboreal and aesthetic significance.

William Gilpin (1724 to 1804).

During summer months, Gilpin travelled around the country, making watercolours and keeping journals in which he crystallised his personal theories about picturesque landscapes. 

Editor's Preface: In illustrating the present edition of the Forelt Sceneery, it has been our endeavour to interfere as little as possible with the arrangement originally adopted by Mr Gilpin. We have therefore considered it best to introduce each respective portion of our observations immediately after the original matter to which it refers and to distinguish our remarka the more perfectly. The reader will observe that they are printed in a smaller type than those of Mr Gilpin.

Whilst we have retained the most essential of Mr Gilpin's delineations, we have deemed it advisable to change, or to improve, several of them. A number of illustrations have been added from original sketches, by Mr Kidd and Mr For bes, both of them celebrated artists in their respective departments, whose labours, we trust, will be found to have considerably improved the value of Mr Gilpin's book.

Remarks On Forest Scenery And Other Woodland Views Volume 2 (Revised)

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Remarks On Forest Scenery And Other Woodland Views Volume 2 (Revised)

William Gilpin visits and views sites of arboreal and aesthetic significance.

William Gilpin (1724 to 1804).

During summer months, Gilpin travelled around the country, making watercolours and keeping journals in which he crystallised his personal theories about picturesque landscapes. 

Editor's Preface: In illustrating the present edition of the Forelt Sceneery, it has been our endeavour to interfere as little as possible with the arrangement originally adopted by Mr Gilpin. We have therefore considered it best to introduce each respective portion of our observations immediately after the original matter to which it refers and to distinguish our remarka the more perfectly. The reader will observe that they are printed in a smaller type than those of Mr Gilpin.

Whilst we have retained the most essential of Mr Gilpin's delineations, we have deemed it advisable to change, or to improve, several of them. A number of illustrations have been added from original sketches, by Mr Kidd and Mr For bes, both of them celebrated artists in their respective departments, whose labours, we trust, will be found to have considerably improved the value of Mr Gilpin's book.

Rural Rides - Volume 1

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Rural Rides - Volume 1

A horse and rider travelling around Southern England in the 1820's.

VOLUME ! - "There is no better way of rediscovering a lost but still not forgotten England than to turn to the colourful pages of William Cobbett's Rural Rides," writes Asa Briggs in the Introduction to this volume.

Already when Cobbett began to write the accounts of his journeys in 1821, the England which he had known as a boy was beginning to look and to feel different. The landscape was changing as a result of the double impact of agricultural enclosure and the growth of towns: society too was changing as a result of the combined influences of industry, finance and war.

To many of Cobbett's contemporaries the changes were good, visible signs of the " march of improvement"; to Cobbett and his followers they were bad, but it still seemed that there was time enough to reverse them. "Events are working together".

Cobbett wrote in 1825, "to make the country worth living in which, for the great body of the people, is at present hardly the case." It was for the sake of discovering the true state of affairs and appealing to others to help promote the proper remedies that Cobbett began to travel round England.

Rural Rides - Volume 2

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Rural Rides - Volume 2

A horse and rider travelling around Southern England in the 1820's.

VOLUME 2 - "There is no better way of rediscovering a lost but still not forgotten England than to turn to the colourful pages of William Cobbett's Rural Rides," writes Asa Briggs in the Introduction to this volume.

Already when Cobbett began to write the accounts of his journeys in 1821, the England which he had known as a boy was beginning to look and to feel different. The landscape was changing as a result of the double impact of agricultural enclosure and the growth of towns: society too was changing as a result of the combined influences of industry, finance and war.

To many of Cobbett's contemporaries the changes were good, visible signs of the " march of improvement"; to Cobbett and his followers they were bad, but it still seemed that there was time enough to reverse them. "Events are working together".

Cobbett wrote in 1825, "to make the country worth living in which, for the great body of the people, is at present hardly the case." It was for the sake of discovering the true state of affairs and appealing to others to help promote the proper remedies that Cobbett began to travel round England.

Salisbury Plain Its Stones, Cathedral City, Valleys And Folk

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Salisbury Plain Its Stones, Cathedral City, Valleys And Folk

The places, people and stories that occupy Salisbury Plain.

Book Introduction: Besides depending upon the classic authority of Sir Richard Colt Hoare, and the topographical and biographical writings of our earlier Wiltshire antiquary, the only and incomparable John Aubrey, I have drawn freely for information upon the Magazine of the Wiltshire Archaeological Society, and upon Wiltshire Notes and Queries.

On Salisbury and the Cathedral there are many books; among the more recent writings on special points I may mention those of the Rev C Wordsworth, Mr Maiden and Mr C Haskins.

The Plain has been adopted of late years as a military training ground. But there is less change, however, than might be thought. The landscape is so large and open that the camps scattered here and there from April to September—and even the permanent settlements are soon lost and forgotten in its immensity.

Salisbury, The Cathedral And See

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Salisbury, The Cathedral And See

An architectural description of Salisbury Cathedral

Preface: This series of monographs has been planned to supply visitors to the great English Cathedrals with accurate and well illustrated guide books at a popular price. The aim of each writer has been to produce a work compiled with sufficient knowledge and scholarship to be of value to the student of archaeology and history, and yet not too technical in language for the use of an ordinary visitor or tourist.

From the authors: There is probably no cathedral church in Europe, certainly no other English one, that has such a clear record of its history as Salisbury. Whereas in almost every other instance we have only vague legendary accounts of the original foundation of the building, in this case there is a trustworthy chronicle of its first inception and each successive stage of its progress extant.

Songs Of Lymington Vol 2

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Songs Of Lymington Vol 2

Poems and Verse

Songs Of Lymington Vol 2 by Henry Doman (1820 to 1885).

Book  Introduction: A year or two ago into the world an unpretentious book of song I sent, Much fearing such bold emprise to repent. Some look'd upon't with mighty scorn, and curled disdainful lips, loud wondering what was meant by such presumption.

Some, to mercy bent, suspended judgment, read, and gave it place with nobler volumes.
 

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